Free shipping on all orders over $49. See terms

Free shipping on all orders over $49. See terms

 
oxo360 transition cups with milk

Everything You Need to Know About OXO’s 360 Transition Cup

When your tot is ready to ditch the bottle, this cup makes it easy to switch. Learn how it works, the best way to clean the cup and kid-friendly drinking tips.

8 min read

Along with starting solids and teaching your little one to use a spoon, moving from breast or bottle feeding to a cup is a fun and important mealtime milestone. But among the dozens of colorful containers on the market, which one is best for this kind of transition? And are 360 cups good for the development of your child’s drinking skills?

Learning how to use 360 cups isn’t hard—if you’re not familiar, these smart, leak-proof vessels make the process of transitioning from bottle to cup a whole lot easier. But not all 360 cups are created equal, and there are certain features you’ll want to be sure are included in the one you choose for your child.

Ready to make the switch? Take a look at how these cups work, the best way to clean them and when to stop using this product as your tot ages out. Cheers to successful and healthy drinking at meals and snack time!

How 360 Cups Work

The genius of the sturdy, no-leak OXO 360 Transition Cup is that it minimizes spills and messes when a child is learning how to drink from a regular cup for the first time. How? Through a clever design that allows the cup to automatically seal when a tot stops drinking. Plus, the 360-degree design means sips can be taken from any side of the cup’s top, which eases a baby’s frustration while also satisfying thirst (he’ll always get water, no matter where he sips).

Transitional 360 cups are similar to straw cups in that they’re easy-to-grasp and unbreakable. The OXO 360 Transition Cup also has a wide bottom and a soft collar that’s easy to grip while drinking. It comes in three shade combos (opal, dusk and blossom).

Another plus: The lower portion of OXO’s cup is clear and marked with measurements so you can gauge your baby’s consumption. The cup is portable and easy to tote when you’re out doing errands, playing in the park or packing your child’s bag for daycare or the sitter.

The cups come in two-packs and in two convenient sizes (six and nine ounces), giving you options for little and big drinkers.

How to Drink From OXO’s 360 Transition Cup 

A good way to teach your child to drink from a 360 cup is to let him play with it as you talk about how to use it. Point out the handles and let him turn it around—even upside down. Next, let him see you add water to the cup and then place the cup close to his mouth and let him handle it. (Remember: There’s no mess. The top seals shut unless your child is drinking). Tilt it slightly toward him while pressing down on the seal around the cup’s edge in order to release some water.

You can also mimic the mouth motion needed to press down on the cup top to show him how to break the seal and get the liquid to flow. It’s smart to introduce OXO’s 360 Transition Cup when your tot is relaxed and not hungry or terribly thirsty. Bring it out in the morning or after naptime and keep cup sessions short. If your baby tosses it aside, you can quit and try again later.

How to Clean Your 360 Cup

Plastic and rubber cups can trap drops of leftover milk, juice and other liquids in some of the crevices. Fortunately, cleaning the 360 cup is a breeze as the container’s components come apart so you can give them all a good scrub. To start the cleaning process for the 360 cup, you’ll want tools like a bottle brush and a smaller brush for hard-to-reach spots.

Next, soak the cup parts for a few minutes in a sink of soapy water. Use the bigger bottle brush to clean the larger parts and the detail brush for under the rim and collar. Once the grime is removed you can disinfect cups in the dishwasher. If you spy mold, mix equal parts distilled white vinegar and warm water and then soak the cup pieces in it for 10 minutes or overnight. Lastly, give everything another scrub, rinse and dry.

Are 360 Cups Good for Speech Development?

As a product meant to transition tots from one stage to the next, a 360 cup or a sippy or straw version is great. But if your child relies on it for too long, it can be problematic. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)(Opens in a new window), overreliance on bottles can lead to speech delays. Specialty cups (360, sippy, straw) are fine for training purposes, but an open cup should be the ultimate goal.

How Are 360 Cups Different From Sippy Cups?

While both 360 cups and their sippy cousins are temporary training tools to help tots move to an open cup, there is a difference in the way the liquid is accessed. OXO’s 360 Transition Cup allows for sipping at any point on the cup’s rim (and the design resembles a regular cup), while a sippy cup sports a spout on top that’s used more for sucking, similar to a bottle or breast nipple.

Are 360 Cups Good or Bad for Teeth?

While a training cup filled with water is fine to use while your child transitions from bottle to adult cup, be judicious about filling it with juice, soda or milk. Per the AAP, these liquids can pool around teeth, leading to decay, cavities and issues with alignment. So stick with plain H2O to protect your little one’s teeth.

When to Stop Using 360 Cups

Experts say little kids should move on from training containers and drink from a regular cup by the age of two. You can start to offer the OXO 360 Transition Cup as early as six to nine months, bringing it out at meals and snack time to accompany your child’s usual bottle or breastfeeding sessions.

But avoid letting your little one tote his training cup from room to room all day or bring it to bed since this practice can lead to drinking too much and relying on the cup for comfort. As you transition away from the 360 cup, you can offer a big-kid water bottle for on-the-go drinking.

Now that your child has mastered the art of drinking from a transition cup, how about eating with utensils?

#OXOBetter

Commit every single day with @OXO